Wildlife translocations at Faure Island

Wildlife translocations at Faure Island

Since 2002, five species of threatened mammals have been reintroduced to Faure Island in 16 different translocation events.

Healthy wild populations of four species now occur on Faure Island.  The population of the Burrowing Bettong (Boodie) is estimated at around 20,000 animals. AWC is confident that there are stable, self-sustaining populations of the remaining three species, specifically the Banded Hare-wallaby, Western Barred Bandicoot and Shark Bay Mice and Faure Island was used as a source population for translocations of these species to Mt Gibson in 2017.

The fifth species reintroduced to Faure Island was the Greater Stick-nest Rat.  Unfortunately, Greater Stick-nest Rats have not been recorded in several years.  Numbers are either too low to detect or the reintroduction has failed. 

The successful establishment of native mammals on  Faure Island is significant because, after over 100 years operating as pastoral property stocked with sheep and goats, there were no native mammals left on Faure Island, other than the Northern Freetail Bat, when AWC acquired the property in 1999.  Soon after acquisition, AWC conducted a comprehensive fauna survey including an analysis of sub-fossil remains.  There was evidence of prior occupation by Brush-tailed Bettongs (Woylie), Western Barred Bandicoots and Shark Bay Mice on Faure Island.  While no subfossil evidence of Boodies or Banded Hare-wallabies was identified, these animals were found in other parts of the Shark Bay region and are likely to have previously existed on Faure.