Feral predator control at North Head

Feral predator control at North Head

Australia has the highest mammal extinction rate in the world. The introduction of cats and foxes to Australia has been devastating for native wildlife.

The feral cat has been identified as having a major impact on 120 threatened species in NSW alone and the fox has played a major role in the decline of many native species throughout Australia. The small, isolated population of Long-nosed Bandicoots on North Head are particularly susceptible to foxes and cats.

AWC has quantified an abundance of cats at North Head and their preferred habitats. We have discovered that the cats on North Head are predominately domestic pets that make forays into bushland and attack local fauna. The density of foxes on North Head is relatively low, with no establish population. However, foxes occasionally disperse to the headland where they are capable of causing high mortality amongst native wildlife if not rapidly detected and eradicated. AWC is using a range of techniques to monitor North head for incursions of feral predators, including spotlighting and infra-red cameras.

The control of foxes involves baiting and shooting, as required, conducted by NSW NPWS and Harbour Trust around the headland.