Press Release

Global accolades for 30 years of conservation

02 Aug. 2021
W Lawler/AWC

AWC celebrates 30 years of conservation today with the release of its first Impact Report and a video that includes accolades from HRH The Prince of Wales and Sir David Attenborough.

Thirty years on from its early beginnings, AWC protects more native species than any other non-government body.

 

 

HRH The Prince of Wales has been Patron of AWC since 2013 and in a video message of support he expressed his gratitude for the dedication AWC has shown to preserving Australian wildlife.

“I particularly wanted to send my warmest congratulations and gratitude to the Australian Wildlife Conservancy team for their outstanding work over these past thirty years,” HRH The Prince of Wales said. “Their science-based approach and innovative land management practices are making a significant impact in protecting wildlife across Australia.”

 

Australian Wildlife Conservancy was founded 30 years ago with the purchase of Karakamia Wildlife Sanctuary. W Lawler/AWC
AWC was founded 30 years ago with the purchase of Karakamia Wildlife Sanctuary.

 

Sir David Attenborough is also a long-time supporter of AWC’s work and has praised Australian Wildlife Conservancy for its science-led model that he described as “essential” to successful conservation.

“That’s why AWC is so very important, and science runs through the whole activities of AWC in a most admirable way, and it is essential that it should if it’s going to succeed,” Sir David said. “There are a lot of ingredients to success in conservation. Part of it, of course is money. Part of it, of course is having the area where you can do things. Part of it, of course is having science behind you, and part of it, of course is having dedicated people who would give their lives to dealing with these problems.”

 

Tim Allard, AWC CEO, reveals that the organisation plans to scale up our conservation efforts in the coming years. B Leue/AWC
Tim Allard, AWC CEO, reveals that the organisation plans to scale up our conservation efforts in the coming years.

 

Tim Allard, AWC’s Chief Executive Officer, welcomed the support, saying it reinforces the critical importance of protecting Australia’s wildlife.

“Australia’s unique biodiversity remains under threat. To meet the challenge, it is critical that we scale up our conservation efforts and continue to prioritise the restoration of our landscapes and native animals,” Allard said.

 

AWC has translocated over 6,000 animals from 20 species including numbats. W Lawler/AWC
AWC has translocated over 6,000 animals from 20 species including numbats.

 

The AWC Impact Report released today notes that over the last 30 years, AWC undertakes the most extensive wildlife translocation program in Australia with over 6,000 animals from 20 species translocated across 31 sanctuaries over the last 30 years.

AWC also conducts Australia’s largest biodiversity monitoring program, alongside a diverse suite of ecological research projects. It is currently conducting, hosting or collaborating on over 140 scientific projects across owned sanctuaries and partnership sites.

 

AWC's team of scientists, Oli Oylan, Eri Mulder, and Rhiannon Khoury, taking flight at Pungalina-Seven Emu Wildlife Sanctuary. AWC
AWC’s team of scientists, Oli Oylan, Eri Mulder, and Rhiannon Khoury, taking flight at Pungalina-Seven Emu Wildlife Sanctuary.

 

“To reverse the current tide of extinctions and prepare for the impacts of a changing climate AWC is developing innovative financing mechanisms that will help fund our ever-growing and increasingly complex conservation initiatives,” Allard said. “We’re forming innovative partnerships that combine the power of philanthropy with private enterprise, the public sector and Indigenous communities. Continued collaboration and innovation across science, research and land management will help ensure the survival of Australia’s wildlife,” Allard said.

View AWC’s inaugural Impact Report – here 

View AWC’s 30-year timeline – here 

Learn more about AWC’s work in effective conservation, here.

Australia’s wildlife needs our help now more than ever. Please support this groundbreaking project and help save Australia’s threatened wildlife.

Subscribe to receive our latest news from the field

    Latest news from the field

    J Kalinkina/AWC
    Feature News from the Field 24 Sep. 2021

    Wildflower season ‘best in a lifetime’ at Mt Gibson

    News from the Field 15 Sep. 2021

    Cape York: a Refuge for Reclusive Raptor